Parole in Place, the solution if you do not have legal status




Exciting Immigration News for Military Families

Parole in Place could be the solution for you if you do not have legal status

In November 2013, U.S. Immigration issued a policy memorandum regarding the parole of spouses, children and parents of Active Duty Members of the U.S. Armed Forces, the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, and Former Members of the U.S. Armed Forces or Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve.

How will my family member benefit from parole?
During any period of parole your family member will be able to live and work legally in the U.S. Your family member will be able to obtain a work permit, a social security number, a license, and to be able to travel outside of the U.S. with permission. Parole is authorized for one year with extensions granted in one year increments.

Who qualifies?
Spouses, children and parents of Active Duty Members of the U.S. Armed Forces, the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, and Former Members of the U.S. Armed Forces or Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve.

How does my spouse, parent, or child apply?
Your attorney will prepare all forms on your relative’s behalf and will need to submit the following as proof:

  • Two identical, color, passport style photographs of the applicant;
  • Evidence of the family relationship between the applicant and you (the military or former military personnel) for example, a marriage certificate or birth certificate as applicable;
  • Evidence that you are an Active Duty member of the U.S. Armed Forces, in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve or proof that you previously served in the U.S. Armed Forces or the Selected Reserve or the Ready Reserve such as a photocopy of both the front and back of the service member’s military identification card (DD Form 1173);
  • Evidence of any additional favorable discretionary factors that the applicant wishes to have considered like letter of reference, proof of educational or professional accomplishments, or community service.

After the grant of parole, what is the next step?
Depending on your relative’s specific immigration and criminal history your relative may be able to apply for lawful permanent residency (a greencard). Eventually, lawful permanent residency can lead to U.S. Citizenship.

Please contact us today at (916) 613-9553. We have extensive experience dealing with the particular immigration needs of military personnel and their families and we are sensitive to your unique circumstances. We have offices conveniently located in Sacramento and the Bay Area (Santa Clara and San Francisco) but we help clients all over the U.S. and abroad. Even if you have to move regularly for your military commitments we can still help you and your family. Contact us at (916) 613-3553.

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Published by: The Ranchod Law Group
























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