Can Justin Bieber be deported?

Saturday, April 29, 2017 | Last Updated: October 19, 2015
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Can Justin Bieber be deported?

Immigration attorney answers your questions about Justin Bieber deportation

Can Justin Bieber really be deported? YES!



Can Justin Bieber really be deported? YES!

The petition to deport Justin Bieber has reached over 210,000 signatures at the time of this writing, requiring a response from the White House. While we wait for the White House to respond, the question looms, can Justin Bieber really be deported? The answer is yes but unlikely.

Bieber is reportedly a lawful permanent resident (he has his greencard), he is not a U.S. Citizen. Bieber can lose his greencard and be deported from the U.S. for some types of criminal activity. While Bieber has yet to be convicted of any crime, admission of a crime could make Bieber “inadmissible,” which would present a problem when Bieber travels outside of the U.S., as explained below. A conviction can absolutely make Bieber deportable.

Bieber has been accused of a series of less serious crimes, egging a home and driving under the influence. Bieber’s biggest issue, however, revolves around his drug use. According to TMZ, Bieber had a urine test after his arrest on suspicion of drag racing and driving under the influence on Jan. 23, and the test came back positive for THC (marijuana) and Alprazolam, which is a key ingredient in the prescription anti-anxiety medication Xanax. Bieber also reportedly told police he had been smoking marijuana in his recording studio all night long and said his mom gave him the pills. TMZ also reports, using photo evidence, that Bieber apparently uses codeine, though this was not indicated in the toxicology report. Marijuana, Alprazolam, and codeine are all controlled substances, schedules I, IV, and II, respectively. Law enforcement executed a search warrant recently at Bieber’s home but the warrant was for video equipment so they weren’t looking for drugs.

Section 212(a)(2)(A)(i)(II) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) provides that “any alien convicted of, or who admits having committed, or who admits committing acts which constitute the essential elements of a violation of (or conspiracy or attempt to violate) any law or regulation of a State, the United States, or a foreign country relating to a controlled substance (as defined in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802)), is inadmissible.” INA § 212(a)(2)(A)(i)(II). Similarly, section 237(a)(2)(B)(i) of the INA provides that “[a]ny alien who at time after admission has been convicted of a violation of (or a conspiracy or attempt to violate) any law or regulation of a State, the United States, or a foreign country relating to a controlled substance (as defined in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802), other than a single offense involving possession for one’s own use of thirty grams or less of marijuana is deportable.” INA § 237(a)(2)(B)(i).

If Bieber really admitted to using marijuana and Alprazolam he could be considered “inadmissible.” This would be of no consequence to Bieber so long as Bieber remains inside of the U.S. (because he has already been “admitted”) but when Bieber travels outside of the U.S. and attempts to return (get “admitted” to the U.S. again) the finding of “inadmissibility” will lead him to be placed in removal (deportation) proceedings.

If Bieber was actually convicted of a controlled substance violation, “other than a single offense involving possession for one’s own use of thirty grams or less of marijuana,” he could be deported.

All in all, it seems Bieber, and his music, are here to stay! Bieber may be able to get naturalized as soon as he is eligible so that he doesn’t have to worry about his indiscretions leading to his deportation.

As always, today’s blog is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. This blog is for educational purposes only. If you have questions about your own immigration case, remember that each case is unique. Please contact our office at (916) 613-3553 or info@ranchodlaw.com to schedule a consultation.

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Published by: The Ranchod Law Group





















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