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L-1 Visa Requirements

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The L-1 visa, I’ve found in my work as an immigration attorney, has been in demand in the San Jose and San Francisco Bay areas. The point of the L-1 visa is to allow managers, executives or workers who work in a foreign country to transfer to a branch or subsidiary company in the U.S. If no U.S. office exists, then a L-1 may be granted to establish a new office in the U.S.

Large companies that do a lot of business can obtain Blanket L-1 visas, which allows for the quick processing of paperwork and issuing of visas. In order to qualify, a company must employ at least 1,000 U.S. workers, have generated sales of $25 million or more and have had 10 ore more L-1 visas approved the year before.Read More »L-1 Visa Requirements

China Popular for Adoptions

I have noted in this blog that when it comes to international adoption in my practice as an immigration lawyer that I have seen the number of children available for adoption from China drop precipitously over the past few years. In 2005, there were 8,000 Chinese children adopted by U.S. parents last year there were 3,000.

The reasons for the decline are related to more adoptions by Chinese parents and fewer children being given up for adoption. Things are better for Chinese families and children, and although that is good news for China that translate into a dearth of children available for intercountry adoption.Read More »China Popular for Adoptions

March for Immigration Reform: An Immigration Lawyer’s Observations

In my San Francisco and Northern California based immigration law practice, I am in daily contact with those who are affected by immigration reform legislation. As a lawyer, I am constantly sifting through ways in which the changing political tides will affect my clients and the manner in which I can help them.

This past week, there have been many developments that indicate that the move for immigration reform is being taken very seriously by proponents and that they are unhappy with what they perceive to be a lack of support from President Obama.Read More »March for Immigration Reform: An Immigration Lawyer’s Observations

Observations by an Immigration Lawyer on Representative Gutierrez’s Threat

As an immigration lawyer in Sacramento, one area I have focused on in this blog is on the likelihood of immigration reform actually happening and the push by Democrats to get Congress to seriously consider such reforms. Just the other day, President Obama met with Senators Graham and Schumer on this issue.

President Obama was, overall, vaguely supportive and that type of support may now hurt him when it comes to healthcare legislation. It’s been reported by the Chicago Sun Times that Representative Luis Gutierrez (D- Ill.), who is from the President’s home state, has said that he will vote “no” on the Obama health reform proposal.Read More »Observations by an Immigration Lawyer on Representative Gutierrez’s Threat

Senators and President Meet: Observations from an Immigration Lawyer

There was a lot of concern amongst those focused on the subject of immigration reform, when President Obama barely mentioned the subject in his State of the Union address. I’m in the midst of immigration issues in my law practice in San Francisco.

On March 11, 2010, the President met with Senators Graham and Schumer, who are both very involved in immigration reform. Together they have a bill in the works. The issues include securing the border and establishing a biometric Social Security card. The biometric card is a high tech form of I.D. that all U.S. citizens may eventually carry. Read More »Senators and President Meet: Observations from an Immigration Lawyer

Intercountry Adoption Developments: Notes from an Immigration Attorney

One area that I focus on as an immigration attorney in Sacramento is the highly challenging area of family immigration. An article published online by the Christian Science Monitor on March 14, 2010, covers what many of us in the trenches have been dealing with for sometime.

The fact is that it has become much more difficult for U.S. families to adopt internationally. I have written about this subject in this blog fairly recently, but it is worth reexamining.Read More »Intercountry Adoption Developments: Notes from an Immigration Attorney

Part Two: Intercountry Adoption—Helping a Child from an Institutional Setting Adjust

This is the second and last part of a post focusing on how adoptive parents can help a child from another country adjust to their new surroundings. In working as an immigration lawyer, I’m often called upon to guide families through the process of intercountry adoption. Families who come from institutional settings may face special challenges in adjusting to family life in the U.S.

The first five strategies that I discussed focused on home and family life. These next five are concerned with adjustments to the outside world.

Finding a Friend

Connecting with a child who is going through or has gone through a similar experience can be very helpful. Your new family member will have someone in their life with whom they can readily identify and who will understand what they are going through.  Try to help them connect with that person.Read More »Part Two: Intercountry Adoption—Helping a Child from an Institutional Setting Adjust

Part One: Intercountry Adoption—Helping a Child from an Institutional Setting Adjust

This is the first part of two on how adoptive parents can help a child adopted from another country adjust to their new surroundings. Although it’s not a legal issue, I’ve found in my capacity as an immigration lawyer that children who come institutional settings face extreme challenges in adjusting to family life in another country.

Often such children have limited or no family experience and they are used to their own culture and to a life that involves schedules and experiences that are disconnected from what one would consider normal family life. Here are five strategies that you can use to help your new family member adjust.Read More »Part One: Intercountry Adoption—Helping a Child from an Institutional Setting Adjust